Stackallen

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Stackallen.jpg

Contents

Brief Feature Description

Stackallan is a small wave on the river Boyne on which most moves are possible! Beginner friendly and has very easy eddy service Can be a bit flushy though and Lucan Sluice- Liffey or Palmerstown are probably better features in the area for the more advanced playboaters.

Location

Located on the River Boyne between Navan and Slane.

Access

To get to to Stackallan

From Dublin - Drive out of Dublin on the N2 (towards Slane and Derry). Keep travelling for about 40 minutes past the M50 (half that is on motorway, half is on normal road). Keep an eye out for a big brown sign to Newgrange that's at the top of a large hill. After this sign it's the first left (don't follow the sign, it's just a landmark to look out for). Keep travelling on this road. (You'll know your on the right one if there is a yard storing plant and machinery on the right about 250m down the road). After about 5 minutes you'll come to a filling station. Turn right immediately. Turn right again before the bridge and you'll you'll see the weir about 500m down the road.

From Navan, If your coming from anywhere in the west it will probably be easier go through Navan. Take the N51 towards Slane and Droghada. It's the second right after you leave Navan town. (note stackallan is actually signposted to the left, but don't follow that sign). After the bridge turn left immediately and you'll see the weir about 500m down the road.

Please be considerate when parking. Don't block the road or laneway down to the house. Also be aware of break-ins as there have been cases of cars being broken int whilst parking there. http://www.irishfreestyle.com/node/7167

Check out the videohere!

Required Conditions

You can see the wave from the road so you should be able to judge the level for yourself easily. It works at all but the lowest level and as the Boyne holds water for a long time it is almost guaranteed to work for most of Autumn, Winter and Spring and for a large part of the summer as well.

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